Chloe

Gaby Aghion started Chloé in 1952 with her husband and her business partner Jacques Lenoir. Aghion was raised in Alexandria, Egypt, and got a degree in political science before moving to Paris in 1945. She met Pablo Picasso and poet Paul Eluard there but was bored with her life and sought out her own form of creative expression. She wanted to create an alternative to the long fitting processes of haute couture and instead offer beautiful clothes that appealed to a youthful feminine style without such a laborious construction process. She named her brand after a friend that she felt embodied the sensibility of a carefree modern woman and coined the term prêt-à-porter. Karl Lagerfeld joined the label early on, and his collections were an elevated form of the bohemian style of the 60s, consisting of billowing shirts paired with skirts. The soft undulating movement of his garments on the runway became a hallmark of the brand's style, worn by the likes of Jackie Kennedy, Grace Kelly, and Brigitte Bardot. Lagerfeld resigned in 1983, and Aghion retired shortly after. Martine Sitbon took over as creative director in 1987, and the brand's popularity grew with the introduction of ad campaigns featuring celebrities like Christy Turlington and Claudia Schiffer. The status of a Chloé Girl quickly became a coveted role. Stella McCartney entered the scene in 1997, after graduating from Central Saint Martins. She brought a provocative edge to the classic playfulness of the label and incorporated the brand's horse motifs into her designs. The next creative director Phoebe Philo began Chloè's line of leather goods and introduced the functional Paddington bag in 2005, which sold out immediately. Today, creative director Natasha Ramsay takes inspiration from the brand's past, honoring its other female directors' legacy while exploring the more androgynous streetwear style that is popular today.

Chloe

A Brand for the Modern Woman

08-15-21

Gaby Aghion started Chloé in 1952 with her husband and her business partner Jacques Lenoir. Aghion was raised in Alexandria, Egypt, and got a degree in political science before moving to Paris in 1945. She met Pablo Picasso and poet Paul Eluard there but was bored with her life and sought out her own form of creative expression. She wanted to create an alternative to the long fitting processes of haute couture and instead offer beautiful clothes that appealed to a youthful feminine style without such a laborious construction process. She named her brand after a friend that she felt embodied the sensibility of a carefree modern woman and coined the term prêt-à-porter. Karl Lagerfeld joined the label early on, and his collections were an elevated form of the bohemian style of the 60s, consisting of billowing shirts paired with skirts. The soft undulating movement of his garments on the runway became a hallmark of the brand's style, worn by the likes of Jackie Kennedy, Grace Kelly, and Brigitte Bardot. Lagerfeld resigned in 1983, and Aghion retired shortly after. Martine Sitbon took over as creative director in 1987, and the brand's popularity grew with the introduction of ad campaigns featuring celebrities like Christy Turlington and Claudia Schiffer. The status of a Chloé Girl quickly became a coveted role. Stella McCartney entered the scene in 1997, after graduating from Central Saint Martins. She brought a provocative edge to the classic playfulness of the label and incorporated the brand's horse motifs into her designs. The next creative director Phoebe Philo began Chloè's line of leather goods and introduced the functional Paddington bag in 2005, which sold out immediately. Today, creative director Natasha Ramsay takes inspiration from the brand's past, honoring its other female directors' legacy while exploring the more androgynous streetwear style that is popular today.

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